That’s Ag Hist

I just returned for the Agricultural History Society Centennial meeting in D.C. It was my first year at AHS, and I expect I will be back! I shouldn’t have been surprised that I already knew so many scholars there, either digitally or from other conference. It was a very collegial conference, and absolutely packed with papers of interest. I was, of course, especially happy to see that our roundtable was not the only equine history being represented, and AHS kindly scheduled the other equine panel back to back in the same room.

And, of course, we did pop over to the museums.

Global Gaits: 19th-century World Trade in ‘Vermont Trotting Horses.’

Or, A Trotter is a Trotter of course, of course.

Mister_Ed_main_cast_2


Take a look at my presentation on 19th century trotting horses for ASEH 2019 Tweets here.

The full ASEH 2019 Tweets program is here.

Mr. Ed, aka Bamboo Harvester, would have been called (unsurprisingly) a saddle-horse, not a trotter. He was, however, descended (like many American Saddlebreds) from a number of trotters, including Hambletonian 10 discussed in the presentation.

Tonight: Watch and Discuss Equus! — Equine History Collective

Tonight, January 16th, and next Wednesday, January 23rd, PBS will be airing the two-part documentary Equus: Story of the Horse at 8 p.m. (check local listings). For more information, and to see the preview, visit http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/equus-story-of-the-horse-about/16877/. From their website: “Join anthropologist Dr. Niobe Thompson and equine experts on a two-part adventure around the world and […] […]

#EqHist2018: Why Equine History Matters

     This past weekend, seventy people from six countries gathered at CalPoly Pomona– once the site of the Kellogg Arabian Horse Ranch and the Pomona Quartermaster Remount Depot– to discuss “why equine history matters.” It was a spectacular weekend, with twenty-six papers on horses, mules, donkeys, and the occasional zebra, ranging from ancient Egypt to the effects of cloning and genomics on highly traditional industries. We had tours of the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library and the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse, and were able to consider the effects of history on practice. In all, presenter agreed equine history matters because it is our history, and because it makes us look outside ourselves. We had the first official meeting of the Equine History Collective. The future of equine history is wide open, and as an organization we will be “cheeky” and aim high.

     Equine History 2018 was made possible by the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library (and their spectacular staff), the Don B. Huntley College of Agriculture & W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Center, UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, UCLA 17th & 18th Century Studies, and the Western History Association. Because many of us are horsefolk, and because as an organization we are committed to making historical research available and accessible to the public and the equine industry, we were also thrilled to have donations from SmartPak, Cowboy Magic, Mane ‘n Tail, and Exhibitor Labs. And, as our keynote Richard Nash noted: it’s hard to top being serenaded over lunch by one of the conference organizers!

Mariachi Los Broncos
Mariachi Los Broncos called EHC Treasurer Kathryn Renton up to perform with them